Book Reviews by a Pioneer: Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie

Halloween nights are not for the weak-hearted, what with all the scary masks. But the fun-filled laughter of the children and the young adolescents is enough to soon put one at ease and bring on a smile on the face of even the grumpiest. The death of a child during such a night is unthinkable.

But this is what happens in a village Halloween party in England. A young girl is found dead, her head forced down in a bucket full of apples bobbing in water, while the other children were shrieking with joy in the next room. The party is also attended by an author, who is a friend of Hercule Poirot.

This is the cue for the famous Belgian detective to make an entry. It is a small village where everyone knows everyone. Who could have murdered a young child, who was overheard boasting about witnessing a murder a few years back, only a few hours before her death? The girl was known to be a compulsive liar, whose tall claims could not be taken seriously.

Poirot goes around meeting people and sifting through evidence to eventually nail the killer before another murder could take place.

Anything more might spoil the chill of reading the book on a winter night. Let me just say… Another gripping case solved by the master detective.

The review is by Sanjay Chandra, author of The Gymnast.

Contact sanjaychandra59@gmail.com for Book Reviews, Author Show, Guest Blogs, and Creative Writing Workshop.

Book Reviews by a Pioneer: The First Year Fiasco by Angandeep Chatterjee

Aratrika Roy joins an engineering college in Panagarh enjoying the new-found freedom away from parental control in Kolkata. Jayashis Dey is another first year student who looks and sounds mysterious.

I have also lived in a hostel in teenage years. I can vouch that walking out of your room to the common toilets through deserted corridors in the dead of the night does get spooky sometime. You look for shadows where there are none.

Aratrika sees actual shadows lurking in the dark. She also overhears whispers not meant for her ears. Then there are deaths on the campus, which let us say, do not appear natural.

This is the detective thriller that the author has woven out of 17-year-old young characters (contradiction is intended). The narrative keeps you on edge till almost the end, as you keep guessing about the killers.

The author has created wonderful and sometimes spooky surroundings in great detail which adds to the mystery.

I am looking forward to solving more mysteries with the young detective and the young assistant.

The review is by Sanjay Chandra, author of The Gymnast.

Contact sanjaychandra59@gmail.com for Book Reviews, Author Show, Guest Blogs, and Creative Writing Workshop.